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Vicodin Addiction Withdrawal Symptoms

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Vicodin addiction is a serious problem for many people, which means they are in desperate need of help getting off the drug. One of the fears that keep people unsure about stopping their consumption of the med is a fear of Vicodin addiction withdrawal symptoms. With the proper treatment program, achieving sobriety from Vicodin isn’t as painful as a lot of people fear it may be.

What is Vicodin?

Vicodin is in a class of prescription drugs labeled opioids. It is typically prescribed for a patient who suffers from pain, either short-term or chronic. For those who use it over a short period of time, it can be a helpful tool to assist in pain relief that they eventually stop taking and do not experience any issues. For many others, a Vicodin addiction takes hold, causing going off the drug to be difficult. Vicodin contains hydrocodone, which the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) classifies as a Schedule II drug. This type of drug has a large potential for users to become addicted to it. 

Common Vicodin Addiction Withdrawal Symptoms

While Vicodin addiction withdrawal symptoms vary depending on the person and the level of their addiction, common ones include:

  • Nausea
  • Vomiting 
  • Cramps
  • Diarrhea
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Irritability
  • Feeling restless or agitated
  • Muscle aches
  • Tremors
  • Sweating
  • Chills
  • Anxiety
  • Cravings for the drug

How Long does Vicodin Addiction Withdrawal Symptoms Last?

While everyone’s experience is individual to them, the average amount of time that Vicodin withdrawal symptoms last is 7-10 days. The most serious side effects typically begin to abate after the first several days. The initial effects are usually felt about eight hours after the last time the person took Vicodin. Eight hours is how long it takes for Vicodin to leave a person’s system. The peak of withdrawal symptoms takes place during the first forty-eight hours and can provide the biggest temptation for the individual to give up and take Vicodin again. 

Even after initial withdrawal symptoms end, many people end up dealing with Post-Acute Withdrawal Syndrome (PAWS). These symptoms have more to do with psychological impact than physical maladies. Emotional difficulties such as depression, anxiety, and panic can set in due to the absence of Vicodin usage. PAWS can last for weeks or months, which makes receiving professional treatment so important. Even someone who has conquered the physical withdrawal that initially happens may find it too challenging to deal with PAWS without support in place. Detox, inpatient, and outpatient programs can help treat PAWS and give people the tools they need to deal with any residual occurrences of it down the line.

Factors that Contribute to Vicodin Addiction Withdrawl

Some of the factors that contribute to which withdrawal symptoms occur and how long they last include how long the person has been addicted to Vicodin, the amount they take, and how often they take it. People who try to quit on their own often have worse withdrawal symptoms because they don’t benefit from medical and psychological help. Treatment programs can provide medication for those who need it. The medications vary, depending on the individual and their specific addiction. They offer relief from many withdrawal symptoms and only need to be taken over a short amount of time.

Seeking Help for Vicodin Addiction

Once a person has become addicted to Vicodin, which can take place after a short amount of time, they will need professional treatment. Trying to quit Vicodin on their own can be dangerous for an individual. If any of the Vicodin addiction withdrawal symptoms become medically serious or chronic, the person is better off already being in a detoxification program or other professional treatment center. These programs are equipped to assess withdrawal symptoms and provide immediate treatment and relief for them. 

People who try to detox from Vicodin on their own are less successful than those who seek treatment while they do it. One of the biggest reasons comes from the difficulty of dealing with the withdrawal symptoms. Another reason is when the individual tries to get sober solo, they don’t have anyone else monitoring their progress and available to help keep them accountable. Treatment programs provide compassionate and knowledgeable staff, including doctors, therapists, and case managers. The person in recovery enjoys giving and receiving support from their peers who are also learning to move past their addictions and live healthy lives.

Alternative Pain Relief Options to Avoid Vicodin Addiction

Many people addicted to Vicodin and other pain relievers mistakenly believe that if they stop taking the drug, they will be doomed to experiencing high levels of pain again. Choices that help reduce or eliminate pain levels are often something a person has not been willing to try or may not even be aware of as a possible option for them. Some fall under the heading of holistic treatment but have proven results that show they can help with the pain. These include massage therapy, acupuncture, and meditation. A series of physical therapy sessions can help, as well as non-opioid pain relievers.

Drug Rehab in Southern California

Gratitude Lodge understands how difficult it is to admit you need help with a substance use disorder. We provide several programs to help, including detox, inpatient, outpatient, and sober living. 

If you are ready to reach out for help with your addiction, we are happy to answer your questions. Contact Gratitude Lodge in Southern California and get started today.

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